Our report early this morning…

Australian Greens Party Cut To The Chase & Propose Adult Regulated Recreational Model For Australia

Australian Greens Party Cut To The Chase & Propose Adult Regulated Recreational Model For Australia

The Greens Announcement  16 April 2018 Channel 10 News Australia

 

Australia’s Health Minister, Greg Hunt, of the liberal (Conservative) Govt trundles out the “Gateway Drug” argument. No surprise there.

Health Minister Greg Hunt on the Greens pushing to legalise cannabis: This has two major consequences: the first is the risk of physical and mental health problems, and the second is that marijuana is a gateway drug.MORE: https://bit.ly/2HCNCS0 #SkyLiveNow

Posted by Sky News Australia on Monday, 16 April 2018

 

The Guardian report

Greens propose full legalisation of cannabis

Richard Di Natale’s policy would also allow sales in licensed shops and up to six marijuana plants at home for personal use

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/apr/16/australian-greens-propose-full-legalisation-of-cannabis

The Greens have proposed full legalisation of cannabis – including for recreational use – with a new government agency to act as the single wholesaler of plain-packaged cannabis.

People would also be allowed to grow up to six marijuana plants at home for their personal use under the new policy, which was announced by Richard Di Natale on Monday.

The policy is the first time a party with significant federal representation has backed full legalisation, providing a point of difference with the Coalition and Labor, which both support a scheme initiated in 2016 to legalise cannabis for medicinal use only.

Under the plan cannabis would be taxed and regulated in much the same way as alcohol and tobacco. It would be sold to adults by licensed shops and attract GST as well as federal excise tax.

In a statement, Di Natale characterised the policy as a harm minimisation approach that treats “drug use as a health issue, not a criminal issue” and a rational response to the “failed” policy of prohibition.

High time: introducing the Guardian’s new cannabis column for grownups

Read more

The Greens’ policy notes that 35% of Australians have used cannabis, according to Australian Institute of Health and Welfare statistics, and there were 79,643 cannabis related arrests in 2015–16, up 6% from 2014-15.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald

Greens want to legalise cannabis for all adults

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/greens-want-to-legalise-cannabis-for-all-adults-20180416-p4z9v4.html

The Greens will become the first party with seats in Parliament to call for full cannabis legalisation in Australia, despite criticism from the country’s top medical bodies.

Greens leader Richard Di Natale said the “war on drugs has failed” and called for the establishment of an Australian Cannabis Agency that would be given a monopoly over the wholesale supply of the drug to shops, while collecting millions of dollars in a tobacco-style tax from consumers.

“Governments around the world are realising that prohibition of cannabis causes more harm than it prevents,” the former GP who worked in drug and alcohol addiction said.

“It’s time Australia joined them and legalised cannabis for adult use.”

 

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Greens announce plan to legalise cannabis to take it ‘out of the hands of criminals and dealers’

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-16/greens-call-for-cannabis-to-be-legalised/9664952

The Greens want to legalise cannabis for Australians over the age of 18, in a bid to take the drug out of the hands of criminal dealers.

Key points:

  • Richard Di Natale says cannabis needs to be sold in a “more tightly controlled” environment
  • He says countries that have legalised cannabis have seen a drop in drug-related crime
  • Under the plan there would be strict penalties for people caught selling to minors

Senator Richard Di Natale argued his party’s proposal would not result in the widespread sale and use of cannabis, and claimed there would be strict regulations on sale and production.

The policy has support from former Australian Federal Police (AFP) commissioner Mick Palmer.

As part of the plan, an agency would be created to be the sole wholesaler of cannabis, as well as the outlet responsible for issuing licenses for prospective growers and retailers.