But that’s not all, lawyer, Peter Sanderson is quoted by Bermuda’s Royal Gazette as saying..

“It appears to have been written solely for the benefit of people who seek to profit from the cannabis plant, and with absolutely no regard to people who wish to use cannabis.”

Here’s the introduction to the piece..

A lawyer called proposals to reform cannabis legislation “a dog’s breakfast” that required a significant rewrite.

Peter Sanderson, a human rights lawyer, said yesterday that a move away from criminalisation was needed, but that the draft legislation fell short of the mark.

Mr Sanderson explained: “It legalises the supply of cannabis, but appears to keep the use of cannabis illegal — in most cases. It is extremely badly drafted with various undefined terms, inconsistent use of terms, unclear language and general lack of thought as to consistency.

“It appears to have been written solely for the benefit of people who seek to profit from the cannabis plant, and with absolutely no regard to people who wish to use cannabis.”

He added that the legislation would “bizarrely” recriminalise hemp and make cultivation impossible in anywhere but a few areas. The draft legislation, posted online by the Ministry of Legal Affairs for public consultation last week, would not allow cultivation within a half-mile of any school or church.

Licensed cannabis farms would also need a plot of land between a half-acre and an acre or, if indoors, a space between 300 and 800 square feet.

Mr Sanderson said the rules were so limited, that they would give a “windfall opportunity” to a very small number of property owners.

He added: “When you look at a map of Bermuda and figure out suitable sites, there are not many places that would be capable of receiving a licence for cultivation.

“It is unclear why sites cannot be near a school or place of worship — the sites are required to be under heavy surveillance and, especially in the case of indoor cultivation, would not be visible from outside.”

Mr Sanderson said the sale of cannabis would face similar problems as the proposal required cannabis shops to be more than a mile from churches or schools.

Mr Sanderson explained: “Given the density of development in Bermuda, it is unclear what, if any, sites there might be for retail shops.”

Mr Sanderson added: This restriction should be scrapped.”

Full story  http://www.royalgazette.com/news/article/20200610/cannabis-rules-confused-says-lawyer&template=mobileart