BUREAU OF CANNABIS CONTROL

(i)

The transition period in the licensing authorities’ regulations allowing exceptions from specific regulatory provisions ends on June 30, 2018. Beginning July 1, 2018, cannabis goods must meet all statutory and regulatory requirements. Cannabis goods that do not meet all statutory and regulatory requirements must be destroyed in accordance with the rules pertaining to destruction.

LABORATORY TESTING REQUIREMENTS:

Beginning July 1, 2018, a licensee may only sell cannabis goods that have been tested and passed all testing requirements in effect at the time of testing.

-Untested cannabis goods cannot be sold by a retailer and must be destroyed. A retailer may not send cannabis goods to a distributor for testing.

-Untested cannabis goods manufactured or harvested before January 1, 2018, in possession of a distributor that are owned by the distributor must be destroyed.

-Untested cannabis goods manufactured or harvested before January 1, 2018, in the possession of a distributor owned by a manufacturer or cultivator may be returned to the licensee who owns the cannabis goods. If a cultivator or manufacturer chooses to sell the returned cannabis goods, the cannabis goods must be sent to a distributor for testing and must meet all of the testing requirements in effect at the time of testing before transported to a retailer for sale.

PACKAGING AND LABELING REQUIREMENTS:

Beginning July 1, 2018, all packaging and labeling must be performed prior to cannabis goods being transported to a retailer.

-A retailer shall not accept cannabis goods that are not properly packaged and labeled. A retailer shall not package or label cannabis goods, even if the cannabis goods were in inventory before July 1, 2018. However, for medicinal sales, retailers will place a sticker on cannabis goods stating, “FOR MEDICAL USE ONLY” upon sale to a qualified medicinal consumer, unless the statement is already printed on the package.

-A retailer may not send unpackaged cannabis goods to another licensee for packaging or labeling. Cannabis goods in possession of a retailer that do not meet packaging and labeling requirements must be destroyed.

-Exit packaging is not required to be child-resistant and can no longer be used to satisfy the child-resistant packaging requirements. All cannabis goods must be in child-resistant packaging prior to delivery to a retailer.

THC LIMITS FOR EDIBLE CANNABIS PRODUCTS:

Beginning July 1, 2018, edible cannabis goods may not exceed 10 milligrams of THC per serving and may not exceed 100 milligrams of THC per package.

THC LIMITS FOR NON-EDIBLE CANNABIS PRODUCTS:

Beginning July 1, 2018, non-edible cannabis products must meet package THC restrictions.

-Non-edible cannabis products shall not contain more than 1,000 milligrams of THC per package if intended for sale only in the adult-use market.

-Non-edible cannabis products shall not contain more than 2,000 milligrams of THC per package if intended for sale only in the medicinal market.

INGREDIENTS AND APPEARANCE OF CANNABIS PRODUCTS:

Beginning July 1, 2018, a retailer may only sell cannabis products that meet the requirements set by the California Department of Public Health for ingredients or appearance.

The requirements listed above can also be found in the transition period fact sheet located here on our website: http://www.bcc.ca.gov/about_us/documents/transition_period_fact_sheet.pdf

For additional information about transition period requirements, or to subscribe to email alerts to hear about updates as they become available, please visit the Bureau’s website at http://www.bcc.ca.gov/. For information on all three state licensing authorities, please visit the state’s California Cannabis Portal at https://cannabis.ca.gov/. Follow the Bureau on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for daily news and updates.

Those looking to get in touch with the Bureau of Cannabis Control can call our Call Center at (833) 768-5880, or send an email to bcc@dca.ca.gov.

(ii)

The Bureau of Cannabis Control’s (Bureau) emergency cannabis regulations were officially readopted on June 4, 2018, and are now in effect as of June 6, 2018. The readopted emergency regulations will be in effect for 180 days. During that time, the Bureau will engage in the regular rulemaking process to adopt its final nonemergency regulations.

The Bureau made changes to the proposed text during the Office of Administrative Law review period to improve clarity and in response to comments. The final text of the readopted regulations, including a summary of the key changes that were made, can be found in the following links.

Final Text of Readopted Regulations & Summary of Key Changes:

http://www.bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/emergency_regs_approval.pdf

http://www.bcc.ca.gov/about_us/documents/readoption_summary.pdf

The state’s three cannabis licensing authorities developed emergency regulations to implement the mandates of the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), which was signed into law in June 2017. The Bureau’s initial emergency regulations became effective on December 7, 2017.

The readoption of these emergency regulations was subject to a five-day public comment period, which was held from May 25-30. The public comment period began when the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL) posted the proposed emergency regulations on its website on Friday, May 25.

For additional information about the readoption of the emergency regulations, or to subscribe to email alerts to hear about updates as they become available, please visit the Bureau’s website at http://www.bcc.ca.gov/. For information on all three state licensing authorities, please visit the state’s California Cannabis Portal at https://cannabis.ca.gov/. Follow the Bureau on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for daily news and updates.

Those looking to get in touch with the Bureau of Cannabis Control can call our Call Center at (833) 768-5880, or send an email to bcc@dca.ca.gov.

DELIVERY

California regulatory reversal: New marijuana delivery rules highlight Eaze’s political pull

 

ARROYE GRANDE

Title: Medical marijuana delivery service in Arroyo Grande loses license over ordinance conflict

Author: KSBY

Date: 7 June 2018

URL: http://www.ksby.com/story/38367379/medical-marijuana-dispensary-in-arroyo-grande-loses-license-over-ordinance-conflict

Extract:

A medical marijuana delivery service became the first licensed dispensary in San Luis Obispo County in December but now, just six months later, the business has lost its license to operate in Arroyo Grande.

The owners of Elite Care Enterprises received a letter Tuesday from the California Bureau of Cannabis Control telling them they are no longer authorized to operate in Arroyo Grande.

“Since we had a five to zero vote from the city council, we felt like we had the support to move forward with this endeavor,” said Elite Care CXO Cynthia Gonzalez.

Arroyo Grande Community Developer Teresa McClish said Elite Care did initially receive support to operate in the community as a delivery service.

Because California state law requires licensed medical marijuana dispensaries to have a physical address, Elite Care applied with the intention to have a product storage facility in town.

The Arroyo Grande city ordinance expressly prohibits a brick and mortar marijuana dispensary.

“Although Elite Care is licensed by the City to deliver medicinal cannabis into the City, the request for a state license for a physical premises in Arroyo Grande would not be consistent with the City’s Ordinance,” McClish said in a statement to KSBY.