STATE

FAQ: What business owners need to know about California’s new marijuana regulations

ICYMI: California Drops Emergency Cannabis Licensing Rules

SACRAMENTO – The Bureau of Cannabis Control (Bureau) announced today that it has submitted the proposed emergency regulations for commercial medicinal and adult-use cannabis to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL).

Those who wish to comment on this proposed adoption of these emergency regulations must submit their comment directly to OAL within five calendar days of OAL’s posting of the proposed adoption on their website. The comment period ends Saturday, December 2, 2017. You may submit comments on the proposed adoption to OAL at:

Office of Administrative Law

OAL Reference Attorney

300 Capital Mall, Suite 1250

Sacramento, CA 95814

E-mail: staff@oal.ca.gov

When you submit a comment to OAL, you must also submit a copy of your comment simultaneously to the Bureau at:

Bureau of Cannabis Control

1625 North Market Blvd., Suite S-202

Sacramento, CA 95834

E-mail: BCC.comments@dca.ca.gov

OAL will confirm that the Bureau has received the comment before considering it. Pursuant to California Code of Regulations, Title 1, section 55(b)(1) through (4), the comment must state that it is about an emergency regulation currently under OAL review, and include the topic of the emergency.

Adoption of emergency regulations does not require response to comments. Any responses to comments from the Bureau will be submitted to OAL within eight calendar days following the date of submission of the proposed emergency regulation to OAL, unless specific exceptions are applicable.

For additional information about the proposed emergency regulations, or to subscribe to email alerts to hear about updates as they become available, please visit our website – http://www.bcc.ca.gov/.

For information on all three licensing authorities, please visit the state’s cannabis web portal – cannabis.ca.gov. Follow the Bureau on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for daily news and updates.

 

Title: California’s New Edibles Limits Will Ban Popular Products

Author: Leafly

Date: 27 November 2017

URL: https://www.leafly.com/news/politics/californias-new-edibles-limits-will-ban-popular-products

Extract:   Major changes to California cannabis dispensary menus—and at businesses making marijuana-infused edibles—are underway after state regulators slapped a strict limit on the amount of THC allowed in edible marijuana products.

When the state’s adult-use market launches Jan. 1, cannabis edibles sold in adult-use dispensaries must be capped at total strength of no more than 100 milligrams of THC. Edibles must also be divided into clearly identifiable servings of no more than 10 milligrams in strength each.

Cannabis CPA Latest Update

Today’s Top News:

The state of California has released it’s regulations for SB-94, California’s Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA).  The regulations and their summaries are found in the links below:

Bureau of Cannabis Control: 

www.bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/bcc_prop_text_reg.pdf 

www.bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/bcc_fact_sheet.pdf 

CA Department of Food and Agriculture: 

www.bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/cdfa_prop_text_emerg_reg.pdf 

www.bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/cdfa_fact_sheet.pdf 

CA Department of Public Health: 

http://www.bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/cdph_prop_text_emerg_reg.pdf 

http://www.bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/cdph_sum_emerg_reg.pdf 

On the city level in California, Cathedral City is taking applications for Cannabis Cultivation, Manufacturing, and Dispensary operations.  Our latest blog post details the licensing process step by step.

In the Weeds:

Check out these additional resources from our blog, your source for Cannabis business info:

 

TAX

Title:  Canopy Taxes: When Cannabis Growers Are Taxed For Ruined Crops

Author: Cannabis Now.com

Date: 29 November 2017

URL: https://cannabisnow.com/canopy-taxes-cannabis-growers-taxed-ruined-crops/?mc_cid=c8622894c3&mc_eid=178dec0b63

Extract: October’s Northern California wildfires, the worst in state history by a wide margin, killed more than 40 people and destroyed more than 5,000 homes. The fires also wiped out as much as $60 million worth of the state’s annual marijuana harvest, according to an estimate from the California Growers Association, a statewide pot farmers’ lobby.

Very little of the damage to cannabis farmers’ homes and livelihoods — if any — will be made whole by insurance or disaster relief funding. Risk-averse insurance agencies have chosen to steer clear of the marijuana industry, and federal money made available to fire victims won’t be extended to stewards of federally illegal crops like cannabis.