Not happy !

Eyewitness New 3 report

The governor’s recreational marijuana bill is meeting stiff opposition from law enforcement.

The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association is blasting the plan.

There a few factors at play, but they all boil down to the same basic issue: The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association believes the bill would make the state less safe.

Some of the state’s top cops argue that passing the current recreational marijuana law would likely lead to more driving under the influence arrests and underage marijuana use.

The association said its primary objection to the bill is that right now there is no definitive road side test to determine whether a driver is under the influence of marijuana and that officers certified as drug recognition experts are only called in after an arrest is made.

In a statement, the police chiefs slammed the proposal.

This bill, if passed, will diminish the safety of our roadways, while at the same time law enforcement is still dealing with the effects of the opioid crisis and the impact that has had on roadway and pedestrian safety.

Gov. Ned Lamont, however, disagrees. He argues the bill would ensure people wouldn’t be arrested for low-level drug offenses because the proposal would allow people to possess less than an ounce and a half of weed. Some prior criminal charges could even be erased.

The session ends in June and there are a lot of other issues on the table. Lamont said the legislature needs to act right now.

“There are number of reasons why, one of which prohibition doesn’t work,” he said.

Lamont admitted that part of the reason he supports the bill is dollars and sense. Nearby states like Massachusetts and New Jersey are already cashing in after legalizing marijuana.