John Hopkins University Hub website writes…

Recently listening to Henryk Gorecki’s Symphony No. 3 brought Rob Jacobs back to a life-changing experience that happened a decade ago. After ingesting a psychedelic drug as part of a formal study at Johns Hopkins, he was lying on a couch at the research center, wearing eyeshades and feeling a deep emotional connection to the music playing through his headphones.

“It was unbelievably beautiful. It literally moved me to tears,” Jacobs, now 52, wrote in his post-session report in 2010. “It seemed to capture the human condition, the beauty and sadness of existence. Melancholy but majestic. … It was like I could see right into the heart of the matter with crystal clarity.”

Jacobs remembers all these feelings, which came on as he began experiencing the effects of psilocybin—the active ingredient in so-called magic mushrooms.

Gorecki’s 27-minute composition, also known as “Symphony of Sorrowful Songs,” is one of a collection of mostly classical pieces that help unlock elevated states of consciousness for study participants at the Johns Hopkins Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research.

The seven-hour and 40-minute playlist, developed by researchers at Johns Hopkins, seeks to express the sweeping arc of the typical medium- or high-dose psilocybin session. (There is extra time built into the playlist, as session length can vary.)

This playlist supported the psychedelic experiences of those who participated in a new study published Nov. 4 in JAMA Psychiatry that found that psilocybin may show promise as a treatment for adults with major depression. A version of the playlist is available on Spotify.

The research center, which launched in September 2019, is believed to be the first such center in the country and the largest of its kind in the world. Its research focuses on how psychedelics can impact brain function and mood in healthy individuals and in patient populations, including conditions such as tobacco addiction and anorexia nervosa as well as anxiety and depression in people with life-threatening cancer.

 

https://hub.jhu.edu/2020/11/11/psychedelic-psilocybin-playlist/

 

It’s all a bit academic for us how about slipping some of these in