We will be following this series with great interest.

The original peoples of what is now the United States were left in legal limbo after the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, which made hemp cultivation again lawful. Federally recognized Native American tribes could not cultivate under state regulation, because the states have limited jurisdiction on Indian reservations. But the US Agriculture Department dragged its heels in issuing federal regs that could apply to indigenous lands.

Caught between two sovereigns and desperate for new economic opportunities, many farmers in Indian country are asserting their right to cultivate industrial hemp and THC-rich cannabis under the un-extinguished sovereignty of their own Native nations.

PART ONE: REVIVING HEMP IN MENOMINEE COUNTRY

The Menominee Indian Reservation in northeast Wisconsin is visible from space. It appears on Google Maps as a dark green square of wooded land, contrasting the lighter green patchwork effect of cultivated fields that surrounds it, and bleeding into the dark of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest that borders it on the north.

Marcus Grignon, speaking from the reservation, is proud to point this out.

Read the full article at

https://www.projectcbd.org/culture/hemp-native-american-sovereignty?utm_source=Project+CBD+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=9070136b7e-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_02_26_07_50_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ea5031784e-9070136b7e-6773181