CALIFORNIA

California Strikes Back: Proposed Law Bans Locals from Working with Feds on Pot Crackdown

If the feds enforce marijuana laws in the Golden State, legislators there want them to receive no help from local cops.

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/292951

Taking a page from laws creating sanctuary cities for illegal immigrants, a group of lawmakers have submitted a bill that bans California law enforcement from working with federal authorities if they attempt to take action against marijuana grow facilities or dispensaries that operate legally under state law. Doing so would require a court order signed by a judge.

Assembly Bill 1578 lays out the goal plainly.

TEXT

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

 

Assembly Bill No. 1578

 

Introduced by Assembly Member Jones-Sawyer
(Coauthors: Assembly Members Bonta, Chiu, and Wood Wood, Eggman, and Cristina Garcia)
(Coauthors: Senators Skinner and Wiener)
February 17, 2017

 

An act to add Section 11362.6 to the Health and Safety Code, relating to marijuana.



LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST

AB 1578, as amended, Jones-Sawyer. Marijuana and cannabis programs: cooperation with federal authorities.
Existing law, the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MCRSA) provides for the licensure and regulation of medical marijuana, cannabis, which responsibility is generally divided between the Bureau of Marijuana Control within the Department of Consumer Affairs, the Department of Food and Agriculture, and the State Department of Public Health. The Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), an initiative measure enacted by the approval of Proposition 64 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, provides for the licensure and regulation of commercial nonmedical marijuana activities, which responsibility is also generally divided between those same state entities. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to establish and maintain a voluntary program for the issuance of identification cards to qualified patients who have a physician’s recommendation for medical marijuana. Existing law requires the counties to process applications and maintain records for the identification card program.
This bill would prohibit a state or local agency, as defined, from taking certain actions without a court order signed by a judge, including using agency money, facilities, property, equipment, or personnel to assist a federal agency to investigate, detain, detect, report, or arrest a person for commercial or noncommercial marijuana or medical cannabis activity that is authorized by law in the State of California and transferring an individual to federal law enforcement authorities for purposes of marijuana enforcement.

Digest Key

Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NO   Local Program: NO  


Bill Text

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:

SECTION 1.

Section 11362.6 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

11362.6.

(a) A state or local agency shall not do any of the following without a court order signed by a judge:

(1) Use agency money, facilities, property, equipment, or personnel to assist a federal agency to investigate, detain, detect, report, or arrest a person for commercial or noncommercial marijuana or medical cannabis activity that is authorized by law in the State of California.
(2) Respond to a request made by a federal agency for personal information about an individual who is authorized pursuant to state law to possess, cultivate, transport, manufacture, sell, or possess for sale marijuana or marijuana products or medical cannabis or medical cannabis products, if that request is made for the purpose of investigating or enforcing federal marijuana law.
(3) Provide information about a person who has applied for or received a license to engage in commercial marijuana or commercial medical cannabis activity pursuant to MCRSA or AUMA. AUMA, if that request is made for the purpose of investigating or enforcing federal marijuana law.
(4) Transfer an individual to federal law enforcement authorities for purposes of marijuana enforcement or detain an individual at the request of federal law enforcement for conduct that is legal under state law.
(b) For purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “AUMA” means the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use Marijuana Act, enacted by the approval of Proposition 64 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election and generally codified in Division 10 (commencing with Section 26000) of the Business and Professions Code.
(2) “MCRSA” means the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act, generally codified in Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 19300) of Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code, and other provisions regarding licensing of cultivators, manufacturers, testing laboratories, distributors, and dispensaries of medical cannabis and medical cannabis products located in this article and in Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 11362.7).
(3) “State or local agency” means all of the following:
(A) A law enforcement agency, including, but not limited to, police, sheriffs, university police, and other campus police agencies.
(B) A licensing authority under AUMA or MCRSA.
(C) Any other state or local agency with information that identifies licensees under AUMA or MCRSA.
(D) A city, county, city and county, or state agency with information regarding individuals who have obtained medical marijuana program cards pursuant to Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 11362.7).

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REVISIONS:
Heading—Line 2.

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FLORIDA

Smoking MMJ Will Not Be Allowed in Final Florida Law

Florida has new, complex marijuana laws. Here’s what they really mean 

http://www.orlandoweekly.com/orlando/florida-has-new-complex-marijuana-laws-heres-what-they-really-mean/Content?oid=3889964

With the passage of Amendment 2 last year, Florida’s already complex marijuana laws are currently in flux as lawmakers try to figure out new rules for growing, cultivating and medicating with the plant. Some municipalities have also passed their own ordinances regarding recreational marijuana that may have confused some people on what’s legal in the Sunshine State. Here are answers to some of the more frequently asked questions we get and a simple breakdown of what’s going on so far: MORE AT LINK

 

MICHIGAN – DETROIT

Detroit’s medical marijuana market in upheaval after new rules

 

 

OAKLAHOMA

Oklahoma Changes ‘Marijuana’ Definition to Exclude Fed-Approved CBD