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AUTHOR: Heather Allman
PUBLISHER:  CANNABIS LAW REPORT

It began as a harmless advertisement I stumbled across while browsing online:

Cannabis Bouquets

Can’t find the perfect words to express your love? Say it with drugs! Each bountiful bouquet is composed of one ounce’s worth of high grade naturally grown California cannabis. It’s the perfect gift for Valentine’s Day, 4/20, or pretty much any day of the year!

The trend of cannabis decorative bouquets, gifts, and arrangements is here to stay. As of January 2020, it was rated one of BDS Analytics Top 10 Cannabis Market Trends for 2019″ and its popularity as a must-have, must-try cannabis item is steadily growing: BDS Analytics › Top Ten Cannabis Market Trends for 2019

This past fall, on November 21, 2019, Jessica Peralta’s original 2018 piece called Say It With Flower: Marijuana Bouquets Are Blossoming:

Los Angeles resident Brian Stippey wanted to create something beautiful for someone in need.

When his friend’s aunt was diagnosed with cancer four years ago, Stippey thought to get her flowers, but he knew she was allergic. He also knew she was a medical marijuana patient.

“I was feeling a little crafty, so I put my floral design skills into action,” said Stippey, who started growing cannabis 12 years ago and has a background in running dispensaries. “So, I created the first faux floral and cannabis arrangement. When I brought her the bouquet, her first reaction was, ‘I am allergic!’ But she soon realized what was in the bouquet. She immediately teared up, started crying, and told me it was the best and most beautiful arrangement she has ever seen.”

She made him promise to share his craft with the medical marijuana community. “She is no longer with us, but every piece I do has a special meaning, and a promise I will uphold,” said Stippey, who in August 2017 launched the Los Angeles-based  CannaQuet Premium Cannabis Bouquets, a service that combines silk flowers, non-perishable decorations and ready-to-smoke cured cannabis.

Part of a burgeoning trend to use cannabis decoratively, these bouquets not only add beauty to the home but also offer a clever way to give a unique cannabis gift.

Stippey, who studied floral design in high school, operates CannQuet via a website but is in the licensing phase of opening a retail location. The bouquets contain lab-tested cannabis arranged with seasonally themed silk flowers, such as daisies and sunflowers in the summer, and poinsettias in the winter, and an assortment of vases including conch shells and driftwood. Prices range from $70 for arrangements that include an eighth, or 3.5 grams, of cannabis;  $140 for a quarter-ounce (7 grams); $200 for a half-ounce (14.2 grams); and $375 for 1 ounce (25 grams) arrangements.

“As trending goes it has really been picking up due to the legalization of medical marijuana in California,” Stippey said. “Women seem to be my biggest fans and purchasers of these pieces. Women order for events such as private dinners, birthdays, bachelorette parties, and for their significant others. Men, on the other hand, tend to be ordering for their significant other.”

Additionally, cannabis florist Cortney Lynn, owner and founder of Bitchin’ Bouquets in Big Bear, California, opened her online business on Dec. 5, 2017. She offers some tips for DIY cannabis bouquets for those looking to complement their weed arrangements and handicrafts: 

Sometimes you can do some pretty unique things just from the flowers from the grocery stores,” Lynn said. If you have access to a cannabis grower willing to share a branch or two, then the arrangements can take on another dimension as the cannabis becomes an integral element of the design.

“Sometimes you can really pull off some really magnificent things from what you have available around you,” she said.

The idea of a cannabis bouquet first came to her in 2017 while she was trimming a plant on a cannabis farm. She had little competition back then, before the potential of cannabis as a decorative element infused the culture.  However, since Lynn started Bitchin’ Bouquets in late 2017, she said she has “seen competition intensify with two in my region that have popped up and another one or two over on Instagram.”

Today, if you search terms such as #cannabisbouquet, or #cannabisflorist, hundreds of posts of colorful floral arrangements incorporating dried and live cannabis appear.

Even High Times ran a September 2019 article by Tanja M. Laden spotlighting this cannabis trend in her How To Create An Artful Flower Arrangement With Cannabis:

These days, “flower” has a slightly different meaning than it used to—but that doesn’t mean you still can’t use it to make a dope bouquet.

Over the course of the last few thousand years, the art of flower-arranging has come so far, it almost seems like there’s nowhere left for it to go. But thanks to a burgeoning popular acceptance of cannabis, there’s an entirely new way to decorate with “flower,” and one SoCal-based wholesale cannabis delivery company wants to help show you how.

To understand the state of flower-arranging today, we need to look to the past. The recorded history of flower arranging extends as far back as 2,500 BCE, when ancient Egyptians used bouquets to decorate dinner tables and honor departed loved ones, not unlike today. Later, the Greeks and Romans also showed an affection for flower-arranging, and were especially partial to unconventional plant material such as acorns, ivy, parsley, and the ubiquitous laurel leaves, which continues to bring to mind athletic competitions and film festivals alike.

Meanwhile, flower-arranging became a big part of the culture in ancient China, specifically in the worlds of religion and medicine.

How is it even possible to improve upon a classic? Plastic flowers don’t cut it, but live flower arrangements still feel inherently ephemeral, as all flowers die in the end. So it seems especially necessary to make flower arrangements even more special right now.

Enter Flower Co., which on top of being a wholesale cannabis delivery company, wants to revitalize the somewhat stagnating art of flower-arranging by introducing “flower” of another kind and making bud part of the bouquet, and anyone can do it. Workshops can be attended at Le Petit Garden in Los Angeles, and Flower Co. is making cannabis bouquet kits that are “specifically designed to elevate any floral arrangement with an artistic assortment of joints.” Each kit includes a wooden box, glass vase, six joint holders, a to/from tag and a letterpress card — all for $20 or $40 for non-members. Right now the service is available in Los Angeles and San Francisco, with the potential to blossom in other parts of the country, too.

Adding cannabis flower in with your flowers truly makes for a novel  bouquet. Please, do try this at home.